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Archaeologists called these presumed pioneers the Clovis culture, after distinctive stone tools that were found at sites near Clovis, New Mexico, in the 1920s and 1930s.As caches of Clovis tools were uncovered across North America over subsequent decades, nearly all archaeologists signed on to the idea that the Clovis people were the first Americans.The origins of the shroud and its images are the subject of intense debate among theologians, historians and researchers.Diverse arguments have been made in scientific and popular publications claiming to prove that the cloth is the authentic burial shroud of Jesus, based on disciplines ranging from chemistry to biology and medical forensics to optical image analysis.A variety of methods have been proposed for the formation of the image, but the actual method used has not yet been conclusively identified.Despite numerous investigations and tests, the status of the Shroud of Turin remains murky, and the nature of the image and how it was fixed on the cloth remain puzzling. This is how carbon dating works: Carbon is a naturally abundant element found in the atmosphere, in the earth, in the oceans, and in every living creature.

As the ice caps in Canada receded and opened up a path southward, the colonists swept across the vast unpopulated continent.Until recent years, scientists who believe in creation haven't had the necessary resources to explore radiometric dating in detail.A 10 gram sample of U-238Now that has changed, and some important discoveries are being made.The hunter who thrust the spear on that long-ago day didn't just bring down the mastodon; he also helped to kill off the reigning theory of how people got to the Americas.For most of the past 50 years, archaeologists thought they knew how humans arrived in the New World.